a-thelittledevil:

“Maybe self-improvement isn’t the answer. Maybe self-destruction is the answer.”

Fight club, 1999.

(Source: agabella, via noble--enough)

Une Femme est Une Femme by Jean-Luc Godard, 1961

(Source: peggymoffitt, via noble--enough)

I want to cry but my eye makeup looks so good right now. Everyone, at some point in their lives  (via heyyitsskenna)

(Source: yukulele, via the-thespian-lesbian)

68,484 notes

iraffiruse:

The potatoes have escaped

(via lightishredarmor)

joshpeck:

do you ever just realize that you’re not a good person

(via the-thespian-lesbian)

56,528 notes

foodtrucker:

please don’t flirt with people i secretly like it’s rude and disrespectful

(Source: foodtrucker, via greenlightoldsport)

427,854 notes

(Source: ozei, via theethoughtofyou)

wethinkwedream:

almostbalanced:

"Become." by Emery Allen appeared on my kitchen table today and I think this is my favourite.

Thank you for supporting me <3
You can purchase my book here.

(via theethoughtofyou)

sceptre:

why do drugs when you can do me 

(Source: SCEPTRE, via greenlightoldsport)

124,831 notes

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

(Source: nurydarbel)

Although many writers had had periods of significant depression, mania, or hypomania, they were consistently appealing, entertaining, and interesting people. They had led interesting lives, and they enjoyed telling me about them as much as I enjoyed hearing about them. Mood disorders tend to be episodic, characterized by relatively brief periods of low or high mood lasting weeks to months, interspersed with long periods of normal mood (known as euthymia to us psychiatrists). All the writers were euthymic at the time that I interviewed them, and so they could look back on their periods of depression or mania with considerable detachment. They were also able to describe how abnormalities in mood state affected their creativity. Consistently, they indicated that they were unable to be creative when either depressed or manic. The relationship between creativity and mental illness – a fascinating study based on writers from the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Kurt Vonnegut was among the subjects. (via explore-blog)

(via langleav)

2,833 notes
Growth is painful. Change is painful.But nothing is as painful as staying stuck somewhere you don’t belong. Mandy Hale (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via veganweedsoup)

60,083 notes

icecreamhelicopter:

malcolm in the middle was the realest show

(Source: googlesenpai, via cherioosalasis)

(Source: lxanderl, via cherioosalasis)